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Location: UFOUpDatesList.Com > 2002 > Nov > Nov 8

Re: Terminology

From: Will Bueche <willb3d.nul>
Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 19:00:59 -0500
Archived: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 14:25:13 -0500
Subject: Re: Terminology


>From: Loren Coleman <lcolema1.nul>
>To: ufoupdates.nul
>Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 06:43:43 -0500
>Subject: Re: Terminology - Coleman

>Sorry my feedback offended
>Ms. Connors. I thought that's what was requested, feedback.

<snip>

>Loren Coleman

Latin roots aside, I agree the word "crypto" won't fly for the
simply reason that the word is currently associated with creepy
words, like crypt for example. This subject has too much "eek"
factor as it is. "Para" has the same effect.

The only research area in this field that came up with a classy-
sounding name are the "cereologists" who study crop circles.

Personally I'd encourage people to say the words "unidentified
flying object" rather than say "UFO," for the simple reason that
the term is abbreviated so often that there is probably one or
two entire generations who have no idea what it stands for,
unless they were a fan of the X-files. Give them words they can
hold on to without any specialized knowledge.

When reporters write on this subject, I try to help them with
their language a bit, suggesting terms like "alien contact,"
"contact," "alien encounter," "interaction", "visit," "episode,"
etcetera, so they realize that in their reporting they can
create more nuance than they would if they only used "abduction"
as a catch-all word (which they often do, even when it does not
apply).

Developing language is important if we are to convey what we
mean, and I applaud Connors for making an effort, even if her
first suggestion didn't seem to take.

By the way, on a related note, I want to mention that anyone who
interacts with reporters might do well to have a few copies of
the young-adult almanac, "Almanac of Alien Encounters" by Eric
Elfman, to place into reporters' hands for instant perspective.
In 168 short pages (with plenty of sketches and sidebars) it
covers the entire phenomenon in depth and most importantly with
remarkable neutrality, in short, easy-to-read entries. Like
children, reporters need info that is succinct and fast, and
Elfman's almanac delivers - and exceeds the youth market it may
have been intended for. Order a case. (It's retail price is
US$4.99).


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