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Location: UFOUpDatesList.Com > 1997 > Oct > Oct 13

Re: The sky over Roswell and estimates of speed

From: Mark Cashman <mcashman@ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 1997 12:11:16 -0700
Fwd Date: Mon, 13 Oct 1997 13:35:04 -0400
Subject: Re: The sky over Roswell and estimates of speed


>  From: UFO UpDates - Toronto <updates@globalserve.net>, on 10/12/97 11:10 AM:
>  Date: Sat, 11 Oct 1997 22:27:07 -0700
>  From: Ted Viens <drtedv@smart1.net>
>  To: UFO UpDates - Toronto <updates@globalserve.net>
>  Subject: Re: UFO UpDate: Re: The sky over Roswell

>  > To: UFO UpDates - Toronto <updates@globalserve.net>
>  > From: Mark Cashman <mcashman@ix.netcom.com>
>  > Subject: re: UFO UpDate: Re: The sky over Roswell
>  > Date: Thu, 9 Oct 1997 00:53:28 -0700

>  > In the interest of providing some material for discussion, I ran
>  > your estimate of 90 degrees of travel in 1 min (1.5 degrees /
>  > sec) through my distance / speed spreadsheet for a range of
>  > altitudes ranging from 1,300 - 21,000 feet. I used the
>  > intermediate angle of 45 degrees elevation to calculate the
>  > resulting speeds.

>  > I also calculated the speed at 100 and 200 miles.

>  > At 1300' = 33.33 mph
>  > At 2600' = 66.66 mph
>  > At 5280' = 133.32 mph
>  > At 10,560' = 266.63 mph
>  > At 15,840' = 399.95 mph
>  > At 21,120' = 533.27 mph
>  > At 100 mi =13,331.69 mph or 21,455.33 km/h
>  > At 200 mi = 26,663.39 mph or 42,910.65 km/h

>  Very good work, Mark.  A few weeks ago I prepared a spreadsheet
>  of the very same material as a tool for skywatchers but I have
>  been too lazy to type it in yet.  Let us examine two different
>  cases of a ninety degree overhead pass.

(snip)

>  Second, passing from zenith to horizon.  From observer to horizon
>  intercept to earth center makes a nice right triangle.  Arccos
>  (radius of earth/ radius to flight path) equals some 12.734
>  degrees.  This indicates some 903.63 miles of travel in a minute
>  or some 54,217.8 miles an hour.

>  This mostly illustrates how treacherous trig can be if you don't
>  define the situation well.

I think I must not have communicated very well what was being
measured.

I selected a point halfway between zenith and horizon, and
measured the actual speed of an object at that point traveling
1.5 degrees in the span of one second, and then multiplied that
speed by the seconds per hour, resulting in the mph of an object
crossing the sky at 1.5 degrees per sec. I believe this is close
to what is called the "instantaneous speed".

Since the size of a degree does not vary from horizon to zenith,
the speed should be the same at any point on the arc.

Since your observation was of an object travelling approx. 1.5
degrees per second across the sky, I believe that my estimates
are correct, but I look forward to any further comments.

------
Mark Cashman, creator of The Temporal Doorway at
http://www.geocities.com/~mcashman
- Original digital art, writing, and UFO research -
Author of SF novels available at...
http://www.infohaus.com/access/by-seller/The_Temporal_Doorway_Storefront
------



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